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Has AMD Castrated Overclocking?

If you’re an overclocking freak, yes. With its latest release of the 64bit processors on the market, mainly the Athlon 64 and the Athlon 64 FX processors, AMD is not allowing much room to the ‘push for more’ world. It’s quite sad for a lot of us who enjoy pushing our CPU’s to higher limits–an achievement that just feels so darn cool, ya know.

AMD’s latest processors do take on some new architecture to handle certain instructions differently, that is a given. But have they actually put a stop to the overclocking madness? Well, more or less, and a lot of people are quite disappointed.

In the past AMD was well know with its AMD Athlon processors, the Slot 1 version, as they were very overclockable to limits of unknown. The overclocking of the Slot 1 was so huge that companies starting building special devices that would attack to the PCB board of the CPU card and allow you to make adjustments by changing dip-switches. If money was tight, de-soldering and re-soldering of resistors on the PCB would allow a person to overclock the Slot 1 processor.

Well, that was a big ordeal at the time for AMD simply due to the fact that their processors were being sought out for the overclocker enthusiast at heart. Then the unfortunate happened when shelves of Athlon Slot 1 processors were found to be counterfeit. Re-soldering the resistors of a 500Mhz Athlon could be overclocked to a 600Mhz processors and sold as a 600Mhz processor.  Consumers of course were not happy about this at all and more so AMD. This led to some very serious problems for AMD and the consumer being very concerned as to what this would or might lead to in the end.

Surprisingly the problem did eventually go away when AMD went back to the Ziff Socket style of their CPU’s. I’ve often asked myself if it was a lesson learned on their end, but technology is always changing, too. With the introducing of the Athlon Duron/XP processors, overclocking was back on track, and the end-user was once again trying their hardest to achieve the ultimate overclock for maximum speed–and well done I might add . . .

This of course had to of had a big affect on the sales side for AMD. Those like myself will buy a processor that overclocks well, and when it’s time to upgrade, we’ll move forward to the next best overclocking processor. I think most of us could agree that we’re willing to spend a few more bucks on a new processor when word is out that it overclocks very well!


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Categories: Computing.