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6.5 million LinkedIn passwords reportedly leaked online

Update: LinkedIn has confirmed passwords were stolen: ”We can confirm that some of the passwords that were compromised correspond to LinkedIn accounts,” — so please update your passwords!

LinkedIn users are the new target of security concerns as a Russian user reported he has hacked and uploaded 6.5 million LinkedIn passwords.

LinkedIn is looking into the report and advised its users to stay alert as it continues to investigate the claim via its Twitter account.

Users should also update their passwords, says Graham Cluley, Sophose security expert, as soon as possible as an added measure of precaution. ”Although the data which has been released so far does not include associated email addresses, it is reasonable to assume that such information may be in the hands of the criminals,” Cluley added.

Another concern has surfaced on LinkedIn’s iOS app about its ability to collect information from calendar entries, passwords, email addresses of those you connect with, meeting subject, the location and meeting notes and sending the information to the company’s servers — without the user’s knowledge. LinkedIn, however, has tried to explain why the company captures this information to clear the air, but has left many concerned.

LinkedIn has promised two tweaks to this feature which will no longer grab-up meeting notes from your calendar, as well adding a “learn more” link to explain to users how calendar data is being used.

 


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